Real-world data suggest current and past cigarette use, a history of treatment with multiple biologic agents, and a history of diabetes mellitus are key characteristics associated with nonresponse to interleukin 17 (IL-17) inhibitors in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis. Findings from this study were published in the Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

The real-world data were obtained from the North American Corrona Psoriasis Registry. In total, the investigators included in their analysis 533 patients with psoriasis who had 6 months’ worth of follow-up after starting treatment with IL-17 inhibitors. The investigators examined response to these inhibitors, defined as disease transition to mild severity (body surface area of less than 3% or 75% improvement) at the 6-month follow-up period.

A total of 308 patients were categorized as responders to IL-17 inhibitors, and 225 patients were classified as nonresponders. The nonresponder group was significantly more likely to have history of diabetes mellitus (24% vs 14%) and be current (19% vs 12%) or former smokers (40% vs 34%) compared with responders (P <.05 for all). In addition, patients classified as nonresponders more likely received either 2 (25% vs 20%) or more than 3 (33% vs 18%) prior biologic agents (P <.001).


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Limitations of the study included its observational nature as well as the relatively small sample size.

In spite of these limitations, the investigators wrote that their findings “may be useful in helping clinicians determine baseline characteristics that can be used to guide clinical decision making and improve patient treatment efficiency.”

Disclosure: Several study authors declared affiliations with the pharmaceutical industry. Please see the original reference for a full list of authors’ disclosures.

Reference

Wu JJ, Kearns DG, Lin TC, et al. Characterization of non-responders to interleukin-17 inhibitors in moderate to severe psoriasis patients enrolled in the Corrona® Psoriasis Registry. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. Published online April 8, 2021. doi:10.1111/jdv.17270