An increased neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) was an associated risk-factor for death in coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) patients with atrial fibrillation/flutter, according to data presented at IDWeek, held virtually from October 21 to 25, 2020.

Using a retrospective cohort study of patients with confirmed COVID-19 and atrial fibrillation/flutter, investigators aimed to identify prognostic markers associated with mortality.

Of the total 37 included patients with confirmed COVID-19, 23 patients (62%) had new-onset atrial fibrillation/flutter and 14 patients (38%) had existing atrial fibrillation/flutter. Throughout the study, 13 patients with new-onset and 8 patients with existing atrial fibrillation/flutter died. Comorbidities were observed in 89% of the population, most commonly hypertension (27/37), diabetes mellitus (15/37), and coronary artery disease (10/37). There were no significant differences in comorbidities between survivors and non-survivors.

Univariate analyses found significant differences between survivors and non-survivors in baseline ferritin (P =.0374), lactate dehydrogenase (P =.0207), NLR (P =.0047), neutrophil-monocyte ratio (P =.0315), and platelets (P =.0146). Multivariable logistic regression analyses found that a low NLR (odds ratio [OR], 0.74; 95% CI, 0.53-0.93) is associated with better odds of survival.


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A high NLR is associated with increased incidence, severity, and risk of stroke in atrial fibrillation patients, investigators concluded.

Disclosure: One author reported being a member of the speaker’s bureau for several pharmaceutical companies. Please refer to the original reference for full disclosure details.

Reference

Chan KH, Patel B, Farouji I, Suleiman A, Slim J. Markers for mortality in COVID-19 patients with atrial fibrillation or flutter. Presented at: ID Week 2020; October 21-25, 2020. Poster 387.

This article originally appeared on Infectious Disease Advisor