As of February 3, 2020, there are 11 confirmed cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCov) in the US, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 

States with positive confirmation of the virus include Arizona, California, Illinois, Massachusetts and Washington. In addition, 36 states are currently reporting people under investigation (PUI). Patients who meet the following criteria should be evaluated as a PUI for 2019-nCov:

  • Fever or symptoms of lower respiratory illness and any person, including healthcare workers, who has had close contact with a laboratory-confirmed 2019-nCoV patient within 14 days of symptom onset.
  • Fever and signs/symptoms of lower respiratory illness and a history of travel from Hubei Province, China within 14 days of symptom onset.
  • Fever and signs/symptoms of a lower respiratory illness and a history of travel from mainland China within 14 days of symptom onset.

According to the CDC, a “close contact” is defined as being within roughly 6 feet, or within the room or care area, of a 2019-nCov case for a prolonged period of time while not wearing protective equipment. A close contact can also include caring for, living with, visiting, or sharing a healthcare waiting area or room with a 2019-nCov case or having direct contact with infectious secretions of a 2019-nCov case while not wearing protective equipment. To help identify and assess patients who may be ill with 2019-nCov, the CDC has produced a flowchart for healthcare professionals. 

CDC flowchart to identify and assess 2019 novel coronavirus (courtesy of the CDC).

Recommendations for reporting, testing, specimen collection, and infection control can be found on the CDC website.


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Currently, there are no vaccines or antiviral therapies to treat 2019-nCov. In a recent telebriefing, Dr Nancy Messonnier, Director of CDC National Center for Respiratory Diseases, stated that the Agency plans to submit an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) package to the Food and Drug Administration. The EUA would allow labs across the US to use the CDC developed diagnostic assay for 2019-nCov, improving the nation’s detection efforts.

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For more information visit cdc.gov.

This article originally appeared on MPR