After careful consideration, the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology canceled its annual meeting that was to take place in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania from March 13 to 16, because of concerns regarding the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak. Although the live events will not proceed as planned, our readers can still find coverage of research that was scheduled to be presented at the meeting.


Repeated cycles of treatment with crisaborole may be necessary to achieve and maintain control of atopic dermatitis (AD) symptoms, according to study results intended to be presented at the 2020 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI).

Researchers conducted this post hoc analysis to assess the efficacy of continuous, long-term treatment with crisaborole in patients with mild to moderate AD who were enrolled in a 48-week, open-label extension study. Patients with AD (n=418; age, ≥2 years) enrolled in this study had completed a phase 3 study without experiencing treatment-related safety issues and were treated with crisaborole at study initiation.

AD disease severity was assessed using the 5-point Investigator’s Static Global Assessment scale (ISGA; 0, clear; 1, almost clear). Participants with ISGA scores of 0 or 1 at the end of a 28-day cycle were not treated with crisaborole for the next 28-day cycle and were considered to be off treatment. Patients with ISGA scores of 2 (ie, with mild symptoms) or higher at the end of the first treatment cycle received crisaborole for the next 28-day cycle and were considered to be on treatment. Patient groups were stratified according to the number of initial consecutive 28-day cycles of crisaborole treatment received during the extension study.

Study participants were stratified in exclusive cohorts, based on the number of initial consecutive treatment cycles: 1 cycle, n=133; 2 cycles, n=106; 3 cycles, n=106; and 4 cycles, n=73. In all treatment groups, fewer than 3% of patients discontinued treatment during initial consecutive on-treatment cycles.

After 1, 2, 3, and 4 consecutive on-treatment cycles, 77.6%, 76.3%, 59.4%, and 43.1%, respectively, of patients had an ISGA score of 0 or 1. Of these patients, 51.0%, 36.7%, 35.6%, and 36.2%, respectively, still had an ISGA score of 0 or 1 at the end of the next 28-day cycle during which they did not receive crisaborole. Of the patients who had 1, 2, 3, and 4 initial consecutive on-treatment cycles, 60.2%, 64.2%, 74.5%, and 82.2%, respectively, reinitiated treatment with crisaborole (mean, 1.8 off-treatment cycle; range, 0-11).

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“Continuous long-term treatment with crisaborole beyond 28 days may be necessary to maintain control of AD symptoms in some patients with mild to moderate AD,” noted the study authors.

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Reference

Lebwohl M, Herbert A, Takiya L, etal. Efficacy trends with continuous long-term useof crisaborole in patients with mild-to-moderate atopic dermatitis (AD). J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2020;145(Suppl 2):AB190. 

This article originally appeared on Pulmonology Advisor