Platelet-rich plasma (PRP), known to have anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects, was effective and safe for adults with psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, according to study findings published in Cureus.

Investigators treated 40 patients for inflammatory skin diseases with a single injection of 5-6 mL of platelet-rich plasma, and followed up with patients at 3, 6, 9 and 12 weeks’ post-treatment. Investigators assessed lesion size, Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI), and Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI).

Included were 30 patients with an average age of 52 years treated for plaque psoriasis, most commonly in the elbow (17 cases). The average lesion size decreased from 8.2 cm2 to 0.3 cm2 (P <.00001) at 12 weeks. Of the patients with psoriasis, 80% achieved complete remission at the last follow-up visit, and the remaining 20% reached at least PASI 70.


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A total of 10 patients with an average age of 22 years were treated for atopic dermatitis. The average lesion size decreased from 8 cm2 to 0.155 cm 2 (P <.00001) at 12 weeks. Of these patients, 50% achieved complete remission at the last follow-up, and the remaining patients achieves at least EASI 70.

No adverse events for either group were reported, and age and sex did not affect results.

The study was limited by its unblinded setting, small sample size, short follow-up period, and lack of control group.

The study authors noted that although there are numerous effective treatments for both psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, “there is still need for limited courses where these treatment modalities are not useable.” Therefore, the results for PRP were encouraging as an alternate treatment option.

Disclosure: Several study authors declared affiliations with biotech, pharmaceutical, and/or device companies. Please see the original reference for a full list of authors’ disclosures.

Reference

Kauhl W, Pototschnig H, Paasch U. Can platelet-rich plasma reduce the burden of inflammatory skin diseases such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis? Cureus. Published online October 4, 2021. doi:10.7759/cureus.18472