Ellen Kim, Author at Dermatology Advisor

Ellen Kim

All articles by Ellen Kim

Cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasia (lymphocytoma cutis, lymphadenosis benigna cutis, cutaneous lymphoplasia, pseudolymphoma of Spiegler-Fendt)

Are You Confident of the Diagnosis? What you should be alert for in the history –Solitary persistent lesion on the skin –Sometimes several grouped lesions –Generalized scattered lesions are uncommon –Either itchy or asymptomatic –Common triggers: arthropod bite, tattoos (particularly red dye), vaccinations, acupuncture, leech application, medications, Borrelia burgdorferi infection, ear piercing –Many cases are…

Subcutaneous panniculitic T cell lymphoma (subcutaneous ’panniculitis-like’ T-cell lymphoma, previously termed cytophagic histiocytic panniculitis)

Are You Confident of the Diagnosis? What you should be alert for in the history Subcutaneous panniculitic T cell lymphoma (SPTCL) is currently defined as a distinct neoplasm characterized by neoplastic T-cells expressing alpha/beta T cell receptors and a cytotoxic phenotype which involves the subcutaneous fat exclusively. This current definition specifically excludes several different entities…

Pseudolymphoma

Are You Confident of the Diagnosis? Cutaneous pseudolymphomas are benign reactive lymphocytic proliferations that mimic cutaneous lymphomas clinically and/or histopathologically. They encompass a large heterogeneous group traditionally divided between B and T-cell cutaneous pseudolymphomas. Distinguishing between cutaneous pseudolymphoma and true cutaneous lymphoma requires the complete synthesis of clinical, histopathologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular data; in many…

Primary Cutaneous B-cell lymphoma (Skin-associated lymphoid tissue [SALT]-related B-cell lymphomas, Primary cutaneous follicle center cell lymphoma, Primary cutaneous marginal zone lymphoma, Primary cutaneous diffuse large B-Cell lymphoma [DLBCL])

Are You Confident of the Diagnosis? What to be alert for in the history Be alert for persistent skin papulonodules or tumors. The condition is often asymptomatic. Constitutional symptoms are uncommon. Skin lesions are marked by relatively slow growth, unless the patient has a large B-cell lymphoma, leg type (which has rapid growth and spread).…

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